Author Topic: Virtual Garden Visits  (Read 241 times)

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IanScott

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Virtual Garden Visits
« on: 23 March, 2020, 08:46:54 »
Hi Folks,

As we are in difficult times with no annual shows, club meetings nor garden visits I thought that we could arrange Virtual Garden Visits using the Forum.

I will try to post an item about the Mecs in my garden, about once a week, and perhaps others would like to 'open' their gardens in the same way.

I trust that everyone is in good health and remains that way,  Ian

IanScott

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Re: Virtual Garden Visits
« Reply #1 on: 23 March, 2020, 09:12:25 »
I always think that this time of year is both exciting and a worry.  Having sown a little seed in late summer / early autumn, I am excited when I get the first signs of germination at this time of year.  Most of my seed sowing takes place in late February / early March and in previous years this seed will germinate in April, but it does depend on the spring temperatures.

I have a good germination of M. 'Fertile Blue Group' seedlings which are in 15ml modules.  I over-sowed and will need to decide whether I should try to split them up when they are a little  bigger, or just thin them, as I only need 100 or so plants for an outside request.



At the same time there is the 'worry' that plants out in the open garden may not have made it through the winter, especially if it has been very wet and warm.  I put cloches over the ones in the small troughs and over things like M. superba and M. dhwojii, but most of the others just have to get on with it themselves. I do have a large beech tree in one corner of the garden and nature blows the beech leaves over the resting buds of things like M. integrifolia which given them some protection in the same way as snow cover might do.



First signs of M. grandis breaking through.

« Last Edit: 23 March, 2020, 11:50:09 by IanScott »

poppy girl

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Re: Virtual Garden Visits
« Reply #2 on: 23 March, 2020, 09:54:16 »
Lovely big monocarpic hybrids this morning. Would not dare to name them<br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /> as I will get it wrong.

poppy girl

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Re: Virtual Garden Visits
« Reply #3 on: 23 March, 2020, 10:01:09 »
This is M.Quintuplinervia.  Had it for longer than I can remember.  I think it came from Janet Wheatcroft at Craigieburn Garden. I lift and divide and move around every few years.<br /><br />

Primula Freak

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Re: Virtual Garden Visits
« Reply #4 on: 23 March, 2020, 11:12:24 »
Lovely idea Ian, will try to post some photos.  Having good germination of Meconopsis and Primula.  Jeanie Jones


Meconopsis_Matt

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Re: Virtual Garden Visits
« Reply #5 on: 23 March, 2020, 11:39:18 »
morning all

Great idea Ian

Yours and Sharon's plants look great. Your seedlings look so much more advanced than mine.

 I planted my seedlings in late Jan this year and they started popping up in Feb. They were outside open and left to the elements when they some started germinating I took fright as snow and frost started to come and took them into my cool conservatory as some of them were rotting off. This didn't really work as the sun came out while I was at work and they began to look worse so I put them back out and put a cloche over them.

Here is where we are now. the pictures below show where some of the seed leaves were rotten in the wet. They also show that the main buds in the centre are still intact and what looks like the first leaves are beginning to develop. There is some hope and optimism for the plants.

<br /><br />
Matt Heasman

Meconopsis_Matt

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Re: Virtual Garden Visits
« Reply #6 on: 23 March, 2020, 11:47:27 »
In my post above, the first image that shows the bud with the rotten seed leaves: I used the "add Image" option when posting. (Red Arrow)

with the 2nd two, much larger images I used the "Attachments and other options" to look on my computer and select the image. (Blue Arrow)

I think the 2nd option to attach is better.

If you use the 1st option the <br/> HTMP code seems to get attached. the other option doesn't. (You cab edit the <br /> before and after the code out, so it is removed).
Matt Heasman

poppy girl

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Re: Virtual Garden Visits
« Reply #7 on: 23 March, 2020, 12:22:06 »
Hi Matt my First few were using the Red arrow,   Add image to post. Trying the Blue  arrow Attachments and other options to this one. All M.baileyi and M.Lingholm were sown in the cold greenhouse in early January.  All others were sown November and left outdoors. We hardly had any snow over the winter and I though they would never germinate.  Alas  a few have so they have now been brought in to the greenhouse as well. You can tell which ones are further behind the ones sown directly in the greenhouse.  The problem now is probaly if we go in to lockdown I will not be able to share these around like I usually do. I have the greenhouse heater set for frost and the vents are all automatic so no worry of cooking or freezing.

Meconopsis_Matt

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Re: Virtual Garden Visits
« Reply #8 on: 23 March, 2020, 22:34:36 »
They are all looking pretty good Sharon. I am hoping i haven't lost too many. I make the same mistake of panicking when the weather turns colder or wet and putting them in the conservatory. I am just going to leave them to their own devices in future. The close up showing the bud and the true leaves still growing gives me some hope.

Some of last years and even the year before seems to be germinating. I usually keep pots for about 3 years.
Matt Heasman

eileen.goodall

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Re: Virtual Garden Visits
« Reply #9 on: 24 March, 2020, 09:00:44 »
This is a marvellous idea, Ian, and will brighten up the days ahead.  Unfortunately I am unable to send photos so cannot help.

Blue Stu

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Re: Virtual Garden Visits
« Reply #10 on: 26 March, 2020, 08:15:24 »
Been looking thro the posts & inspired to add a few. Major upheavals at allotment, in middle of moving my polytunnel & shed & soil is only now dry enough to work so trying to dig it over before rotovating - decided to have an easy day today to recover a bit, just pottering & tidying up at home. Will take my camera out & take some photos.
I don't seem to be seeing all of Matt's photos.
Clicking "Add image to post" gives a big blue "imgbb"  thingy.
Clicking "Attachments" gives the usual add attachments to an email screen.
Does all this depend onwhat browser you're using? I use Mozzilla Firefox.


I logged off for an hour, now logging back in I'm seeing all the images and blue & red arrows
« Last Edit: 26 March, 2020, 09:55:25 by Blue Stu »

Blue Stu

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Re: Virtual Garden Visits
« Reply #11 on: 26 March, 2020, 09:51:28 »
The problem now is probaly if we go in to lockdown I will not be able to share these around like I usually do.

Do you mean because you'll have to stay in? I usually give my surplus veg plants away & I wondered if the Covid virus can be transferred on plants or compost & for how long. I could leave them out at the allotment for people to pick up.

I've heard it can be transferred via door knobs so I've taken all mine off. ;)

Blue Stu

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Re: Virtual Garden Visits
« Reply #12 on: 26 March, 2020, 10:05:41 »
I've been looking at Poppy Girl's photo on reply #7 What were the seeds covered with? It looks like vermiculite but seems small & square, all I've had was larger & rectangular & have stopped using it in favour of Chick Grit which was discussed last year.
« Last Edit: 26 March, 2020, 10:59:18 by Blue Stu »

Blue Stu

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Re: Virtual Garden Visits
« Reply #13 on: 26 March, 2020, 10:31:59 »
These are ex what I'd labelled as CCX1519 from Chris Chadwell's collection in 2015 (see previous posts). The original plants which flowered in 2018 were quite variable & I was carefull they weren't crossed with anything else.
 
http://no1meconopsis.com/ccx1519/ccx1519.html

As an aside I struggle taking photos of plants, the leaves seem to fluoresce, are the hairs acting like a prism or lens? 
« Last Edit: 26 March, 2020, 10:58:43 by Blue Stu »

Blue Stu

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Re: Virtual Garden Visits
« Reply #14 on: 26 March, 2020, 10:57:11 »
Not Meconopsis but Rheum nobile from Chinese Alpines, W/O-7230.

Sowed 24 seeds in long toms, got 10 germinations. Now apparently the hard part starts.
 ::)

Blue Stu

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Re: Virtual Garden Visits
« Reply #15 on: 26 March, 2020, 13:14:33 »
These are two from seed ex CC7714 of which I got three to flowering size, they were very similar. These two progeny differ. The parents were tucked away in a corner to avoid crossing with anything else.
« Last Edit: 26 March, 2020, 13:20:18 by Blue Stu »

Meconopsis_Matt

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Re: Virtual Garden Visits
« Reply #16 on: 26 March, 2020, 21:07:53 »
Well done Stu. Your plants look lovely and healthy. Does the allotment soil you grow them in have added manure or anything like that?
Matt Heasman

Blue Stu

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Re: Virtual Garden Visits
« Reply #17 on: 26 March, 2020, 22:17:32 »
I am trying to build up the organic content of the soil at my allotment but we started from a very low point, the allotment site was started in 1997 on a defunct industrial site, a lorry garage or some such with a hard pan underneath, it floods at the slightest rain, my easiest source is horse manure but from a source very close to the horse. They are kept mainly on grass & we get the droppings scraped off the field so as not to cause infection problems for the horses, it has mnimal straw etc so rots away very quickly.

So really I concentrate on putting such as spent compost in areas for my choice plants to build up the structure & try to give them some TLC.

Blue Stu

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Re: Virtual Garden Visits
« Reply #18 on: 26 March, 2020, 22:37:38 »
Another not a meconopsis - Echium wildpretii

I like the attitude of spikey plants & echiums are among the best, unfortunately we don't have as much sun as they like & too much humidity. At the moment I've got some Echium wildpretii in the greenhouse, I cannot remember where I got the seed or when but its more than 5 years ago. Normally the growing point rots off over-winter so instead of the iconic single spike I get multiple spikes, tho' each plant may last 2 or 3 years. However this year the flower buds seem intact so I may achieve my dream.

I also find it almost impossible to identify & collect the seed so I now just trash the seedhead & let it self-sow. Last year some seedlings popped up on the allotment but of course they didn't survive the winter. 

Top pic this year, nice looking growth points, bottom pic last year, multiple spikes.


 
« Last Edit: 26 March, 2020, 22:43:22 by Blue Stu »

IanScott

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Re: Virtual Garden Visits
« Reply #19 on: 27 March, 2020, 08:12:29 »
Initially I had decided to have only one colony of 'yellows' in the garden so that the chances of them hybridising the Meconopsis grandis was minimal.  As it turned out the M. grandis sulked and refused to flower, despite it being lifted and moved to different locations with slightly different amounts of sunshine. So I was quite happy maintaining a good colony of M. integrifolia ssp souliei, originally from a wild collection, which seeded nicely and bred true. However, a few years back, curiosity got the better of me when I was offered some seed of M. integrifolia ssp integrifolia from a known origin. I thought that it would be interesting to compare the growth of the two sub-species. So I finished up with two colonies at opposite ends of the garden.

There was no difference in appearance over winter, with both sub-species having rounded resting buds just below the surface of the soil. Both colonies lost one or two plants - they were unprotected except for dry beech leaves which blew over them - but most plants survived a cold and wet winter, unlike my M. superba (sigh!) which did have a glass cloche.

My first observation is that the ssp souliei has come into growth much earlier than the ssp integrifolia.





The downside is that, in some case, the plants are trying to flower much too early. One flowered in winter, as I mentioned at the AGM, and another one has a flower bud starting to open at ground level without a flowering scape!  All flower and no leaf.



P.S. Just to be on the safe side, as the shut-down may be extended, I have a good germination of - tomato seed. 
« Last Edit: 27 March, 2020, 09:04:50 by IanScott »

 

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