Author Topic: Meconopsis 'Jim's Ex'  (Read 2009 times)

Peter Kohn

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Meconopsis 'Jim's Ex'
« on: January 19, 2017, 04:33:38 PM »
Offered by the SRGC seed exchange last year. Bizarrely a couple of seeds have just germinated from a sowing last January. Never had a blue meconopsis wait a year before.  Does anyone know any more about this one ?

Meconopsis_Group

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Re: Meconopsis 'Jim's Ex'
« Reply #1 on: January 20, 2017, 09:12:06 AM »
Hello Peter this plant and its seed has given much thought by the Meconopsis Group without getting to technical  we would ask you to keep any seedlings to your self this name cannot be accepted by the group sure you can grow the plants and perhaps in time we  will look at these in more details perhaps it could be considered for an approved name,  good luck  cheers Meconopsis

Peter Kohn

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Re: Meconopsis 'Jim's Ex'
« Reply #2 on: January 20, 2017, 01:40:39 PM »
Many thanks for the advice. As I have more than enough plants of known provenance I think I had better discard these. I'm still intrigued that  I got germination now though one of my fellow volunteers at Sheffield Botanic Gardens did have a similar experience with a violet M. baileyi (which for me germinated at the normal time - March in the year of sowing).

Meconopsis_Group

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Re: Meconopsis 'Jim's Ex'
« Reply #3 on: January 20, 2017, 03:03:27 PM »
Hello Peter many thanks for your consideration  this will reduce much confusion cheers Meconopsis

Allan Jamieson

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Re: Meconopsis 'Jim's Ex'
« Reply #4 on: February 01, 2017, 12:26:39 AM »
Even though the George Sheriff Group plants are classed as sterile and divided by division, they do have a limited fertility and some of them will on occasion produce viable seeds. I know that I managed to grow a few many years ago from Huntfield, before I think the group even existed at which point I was told in no uncertain terms that they were technically "sterile", one of them grew on to flowering size and looked very much like Ascreavie, with much more notched leaves and gappy flowers than Huntfield. I gave a plant of it to Evelyn Stevens many years ago and that was pretty much the last that I heard of it, my own plant just died off, nothing like as vigorous or robust as Huntfield, not really worth naming or growing on.

I think the main point is that any such seedlings should never be passed around under the name (or anything close to the name) of the parent plant as they may well be rather inferior and could cause considerable confusion to recipients if divisions were distributed under misleading or simply wrong names. If in fact you end up with a few really good.distinct seedlings with better fertility than their parents, then there may in time be a case for giving them a separate name but probably only for divisions of the best seedlings, after they have been trialled for a few years in different locations.

The value of such seedlings is possibly more as breeding stock rather than a plant in their own right, although you may well be lucky and get some attractive plants from such seeds. If they can be used perhaps to create new hybrids with some useful improvements on their parent plants, which might include characteristics such as significantly earlier or later flowering seasons, maybe increased vigour, taller flowering stems, larger flowers, different flower colours etc. I got a few of these seeds from the seed exchange to try out, plus I did manage to find a few viable looking seeds on my Huntfield plants last summer too, which I also collected and sowed this week too. I think that the George Sheriff Group plants are possibly polyploid hybrids which is perhaps the reason for the poor fertility that they have but as I seem to be creating other slightly complex hybrids for my own amusement, sometimes I can get seeds from seemingly sterile plants by crossing them with some of my other hybrids. It is fascinating when you manage to get something really good simply from experimenting and crossing a variety of different Meconopsis, in my case only the large flowered perennial blue types for now.

Meconopsis_Group

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Re: Meconopsis 'Jim's Ex'
« Reply #5 on: February 08, 2017, 08:13:04 AM »
Hello Alan many thanks for these details I do find this interesting as several G.S. group plants set some seed here your advice to keep such plants for your own use is very helpful and yes we do have many well established plants that have been around  for sale  these have been named and approved by The Meconopsis Group gardeners should be encouraged to select those the best clones cheers.