Author Topic: Botrytis and mildew  (Read 1391 times)

Meconopsis_Group

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Botrytis and mildew
« on: December 02, 2016, 03:15:49 PM »
Here are some pictures showing unhealthy leaves probable cause is watering when sunny,  over watering, misty days.
« Last Edit: December 03, 2016, 09:40:20 AM by Meconopsis_Group »

poppynews

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Re: Botrytis and mildew
« Reply #1 on: December 12, 2016, 05:14:30 PM »
Drying out is worse than overwatering.

Meconopsis_Matt

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Re: Botrytis and mildew
« Reply #2 on: December 12, 2016, 05:44:28 PM »
This is just a test reply, to see if pictures can be loaded.
Matt Heasman

poppy girl

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Re: Botrytis and mildew
« Reply #3 on: December 12, 2016, 07:58:52 PM »
I can see this picture clearly and enlarge it slightly. I have had a look at other images but cannot open them all. It says the file is not supported.
The image Ian. S has posted today,  in the new images section, is really excellent and enlarges up big.

Meconopsis_Group

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Re: Botrytis and mildew
« Reply #4 on: December 14, 2016, 08:45:38 AM »
I am posting some pictures again some problems with overhead watering when sunny and also normal rainfall with dry conditions we do not spray with any chemicals.

Meconopsis_Group

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Re: Botrytis and mildew
« Reply #5 on: December 14, 2016, 08:55:31 AM »
A few more.

Meconopsis_Group

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Re: Botrytis and mildew
« Reply #6 on: December 14, 2016, 08:58:43 AM »
Most plants recover we remove worst leaves maybe cut them all down they do re-grow.

Marie

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Re: Botrytis and mildew
« Reply #7 on: January 01, 2017, 06:43:46 PM »
Hi there. I would like to pick the brains of this forum regarding botrytis (I think) in mec. napaulensis. I have repeatedly sown this plant, this resulting in a fair number of healthy plants. However, in late spring or early summer, almost invariably,  apparently healthy plants will suddenly keel over and die. Today I removed old leaves from the plants and placed grit around them, and in winter they are covered by a kind of roof to protect them from being rained on.  Is there anything else I can do, or must I simply accept that they just donĀ“t like conditions here in our moist part of the world (Jutland, Denmark).

Meconopsis_Group

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Re: Botrytis and mildew
« Reply #8 on: January 01, 2017, 08:34:06 PM »
Hello this is a problem that many people have especially at this time of year when we expect lots of rain or snow cover. I have grown this species for many years and always lose some plants over winter, I grow most under tall Acer trees which give some protection from rain  also plant on an angle so that rain will run away from plants  we sometimes cover large established plants  but we have no easy answer to your problems cheers Meconopsis

Peter Kohn

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Re: Botrytis and mildew
« Reply #9 on: January 02, 2017, 11:32:44 AM »
Hi Marie

Good to know of a meconopsis fan in Jutland. We spent a very happy year in Aarhus back in 1969-70.

For what it's worth I don't think a wet climate is the major problem. We grew M. napaulensis (hort) with very few losses when we were at Kerrachar in NW Scotland where our rainfall, especially in winter, was very high. Now we are in Sheffield we have lost a lot of rosette forming meconopsis over winter having grown them into large apparently healthy plants. My feeling is that they resent being in pots but I haven't had enough planted in the ground to be sure they are less vulnerable though the reverse is true for the big blue poppies (baileyi, Lingholm etc) where we almost never have losses in pots but have huge losses over winter in the ground, especially in Sheffield Botanic Gardens.

Meconopsis_Group

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Re: Botrytis and mildew
« Reply #10 on: January 02, 2017, 03:06:40 PM »
I would agree each year our weather in winter is different and to save some plants have potted in large pots to place under cover for the winter  some survived others did not recently we pruned a large Acer so put some branches over rosettes will let you know have not had any snow cover yet, cheers Meconopsis
« Last Edit: January 06, 2017, 09:25:28 AM by Meconopsis_Group »

Allan Jamieson

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Re: Botrytis and mildew
« Reply #11 on: January 06, 2017, 11:01:04 AM »
To be honest most of these pictures of Meconopsis leaves look fairly normal to my eyes at least. The leaves are quite brittle and fragile and there can be dark patches on some of the leaves under wet, garden conditions, simple trick is just to remove any obviously damaged or older leaves and keep things tidy, mulching is good too and helps keep the plants in good health.

If you are talking more about botrytis inside a greenhouse or cold frame environment, that isn't unusual either, I'd recommend to minimise this issue, using flowers of sulphur which is quite inexpensive and dusting seed trays heavily with it and then afterwards fine alpine grit over the compost. Try to water in the morning rather than the evening too as this will prevent the emerging seedlings sitting overnight with a lot of moisture on their hairy little leaves. If you have the trays on capillary matting, you can water directly onto the matting rather than the seed trays which again might help a little and try to get your seedlings out of the greenhouse by around mid summer as I find that is when fungal problems seem to rear their ugly head and the young plants will grow much better, more healthily and more quickly outdoors at that time of year as they don't really need any more protection apart from maybe slugs which can be a problem when the plants are still quite small.

poppy girl

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Re: Botrytis and mildew
« Reply #12 on: January 13, 2017, 11:16:41 PM »
Hi Marie    Do your plants show any grey mould on them before they seem to be dying? Does the centre of the rosette seem to come away from the outer leaves? Are the leaves quite brown and mushy? You say you have some overhead protection from the rain but do you know what the water table is like in the actual soil or how deep the actual soil is?
I don't really seem to have any problem in the garden although I have lost some in the wetter area of the border. Slightly higher up with better drainage they grow well and have excellent flowers. If you are getting them to 'healthy' plants you are obviously doing something right and it could just be down to location or the soil in the border.

Marie

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Re: Botrytis and mildew
« Reply #13 on: January 16, 2017, 12:38:54 PM »
Hi Poppy Girl
The plants usually look completely healthy up until the moment they keel over, and I have had it happen outside in the garden and i polyfoam boxes as well as inside a greenhouse. Maybe it is really crown rot that is the problem. Anyway, this year I have covered the surface soil with grit to try and prevent too moist an environment from developing.

poppy girl

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Re: Botrytis and mildew
« Reply #14 on: January 18, 2017, 01:29:34 PM »
Hi Marie  It looks as though you are getting to the bottom of this already. It certainly does not sound like botrytis and more to do with what's going on underground or wet around the crown so keep trying what you are already doing. Don't give up. There's always lots of seed available for this one. I tried to grow the big blue ones for years without success and started to believe the rumour that they were difficult to grow. After some very simple advice from the late Tom Shearer I stopped killing them with kindness and just ensured they were in a location in the garden that did not dry out or indeed was not too wet. Mulching in the spring and perhaps a feed and where I am watch out for late frosts on new growth. Good luck

Meconopsis_Matt

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Re: Botrytis and mildew
« Reply #15 on: March 04, 2017, 02:44:50 PM »
Some lovely picture here. Lets hope i don't get these diseases shown
« Last Edit: March 05, 2017, 08:34:12 PM by Meconopsis_Matt »
Matt Heasman