Author Topic: Meconopsis gakydiana  (Read 151 times)

goworho

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Meconopsis gakydiana
« on: July 14, 2019, 06:39:11 PM »
I have sown seeds of Meconopsis gakydiana, I'm just curious whether this is now an accepted name or should I label the seedlings as M. grandis? Until now I cannot tell any difference.

poppy girl

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Re: Meconopsis gakydiana
« Reply #1 on: July 19, 2019, 06:39:55 PM »
Hi goworho   There seems to be an error at the moment as someone has been trying to post the information you are looking for. Hopefully it will be posted soon, it makes very clear what its all about!
« Last Edit: July 19, 2019, 08:08:02 PM by poppy girl »

poppy girl

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Re: Meconopsis gakydiana
« Reply #2 on: July 19, 2019, 08:07:04 PM »
Response from Margaret Thorne.
Meconopsis gakyidiana is a validly published name, so you should definitely be using it for your seedlings. The two species are closely related, so it is to be expected that the seedlings will be very similar. The differences only start to be evident once the plants grow larger and if you are growing both species, it will be extremely interesting for you to compare the two species and share your photographs on this forum.
The paper describing Meconopsis gakyidiana and its diagnostic features can be found at this link: https://journals.rbge.org.uk/index.php/rbgesib/article/view/193
Although it is closely related to Meconopsis grandis, the two species are geographically separated by a considerable distance. M. gakyidiana is almost a Bhutanese endemic found in the extreme east of the country and just over the border into Arunachal Pradesh and Tibet. The nearest M. grandis is much further west in west Sikkim, though even here the populations are sparse and it is essentially an east Nepalese species.
The status of plants in southern Tibet is very interesting, as they share characteristics of both M. grandis and M. gakyidiana.
If you are successful in establishing plants of both M. gakyidiana and M. grandis, be sure to grow them where they cannot inadvertently hybridise. It would however, be extremely interesting to cross pollinate a small proportion of your population deliberately under controlled and well documented conditions. As far as I know, nobody has yet done this successfully, though it would be good to hear from anyone who has.

goworho

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Re: Meconopsis gakydiana
« Reply #3 on: July 19, 2019, 08:42:00 PM »
@poppy girl: thanks a lot for your information. I will keep you informed about the cultivation process and the flowering  of the plants.

Peter Kohn

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Re: Meconopsis gakydiana
« Reply #4 on: July 30, 2019, 06:56:07 PM »
I have flowered gakyidiana for the first time this year (in my plot in Sheffield Botanic Garden). Very early into flower and rapidly building up a multicrown structure which bodes well for becoming properly perennial. The current weather should make it feel it is enjoying a Himalayan monsoon ! Slightly disappointing colour compared to baileyi or Lingholm - a little too much purple in the blue, at least in our soil conditions.

goworho

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Re: Meconopsis gakydiana
« Reply #5 on: August 13, 2019, 08:48:02 PM »
Hello Peter,
thanks for your reply. I am very curious to see what result I will get next year. What are your soil conditions? I have acid, humous sandy soil here.

Peter Kohn

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Re: Meconopsis gakydiana
« Reply #6 on: August 14, 2019, 04:24:24 PM »
Our basic soil is a heavy clay and the site is a shady 'dell' but without tree root competition. The spot where the gakyidiana has had a lot of grit dug in some  time in the past and we have also enriched with quite a lot of well-rotted stable manure. This summer has been ver meconopsis friendly. How the plant will do if we get another summer like last year remains to be seen.

 

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